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Financial Aid For Single Parents

Financial Aid for Single Parents You would probably think that as a single parent, you could do what has to be done all on your own. You feel that you have what it takes to be a good single parent. Hopefully, you are not one of those who assume that they are in the lineage of super heroes, handling every weight on their shoulders. You would get yourself busy on all sides with the different activities that can show your kids that you, as a new family, can handle it on your own. But has it ever occurred to you that it might not be all about your relationship with your kids? Yes it is primarily about that, but can you do so without financial help? Financial complications usually come up when households of single parents try to have college education covered. This is where you realize that you need aid after all, financial aid.

There are certain policies in having financial aid determined for single parents, like you if ever you are one, that are deemed to be highly confusing at times. This article would gladly give you an overview of the process. In case you do not know, the custodial parent is the one with whom the child, specifically a student, has lived the most in the span of the twelve months that have already passed. If the student admits that he or she did not live with a certain parent more than the other parent, then his or her parent who has provided msot of the financial support in the past twelve months will be the one to fill out the fafsa. Another situation would be if the student got to live with each of his or her parents with the equal amount of time and also if the parents provided an equal level of assistance, in terms of finances, then the parent who will claim the student for purposes of income tax should be the one to do the filling out of the fafsa.

You must never forget that any child support or any alimony that has been received from a non-custodial parent must alwas be included on the fafsa. It might be a bit too late to say this, since this article has been mentioning it for quite some time now. Fafsa actually is an acronym for free application for federal student aid. Now you know, so you can stop creasing your forehead in wonder everytime you read the acronym fafsa. The federal government does not put the income or the assets of a non-custodial parent to consideration, especially when the studentís financial need is being determined. Just in case you do not know, many private colleges take into account the assets and income of the non-custodial parent, even if he or she does not want to be included in contributing to college costs. These said colleges would ask for a supplemental financial aid form from a non-custodial parent. This said financial aid form does a whole lot in affecting the awarding of the aid of the school, however, it is neither federal nor state. Still, there are special cases wherein a number of private collges will waive the requirements for non-custodial information. There is, however, a criterion that has to be met so that a certain single parent household will not be automatically qualified for a waiver.

First, the non-custodial parent should not be found nor located. So this would only make it eventual that that certain parent has not made any form of child support payment recently, and it is also an indication that that parent has not been consistent in his or her child support payments. Next, if the separation or the divorce has happened in tha past of the past, which means it was really a long time ago, then it is highly reasonable to expect a provision from that non-custodial parent. And lastly, if the said non-custodial parent has a history of neglect or of abuse either with the child or with the other parent. Court records will be used for documentation for the said criteria. Hopefully, it is now clear to you that the criteria must be documented first so that there will be a waiver for the information regarding the non-custodial parent.


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